Tag Archives: genetics

The One Simple Key To Weight Loss – and it’s in your hands!

Hands-holding-Granny-Smith-apple

The Key To Weight Loss Is In Your Hands

If You Feel Like You’ve Been Stuck For A While, Then Maybe It’s Time For A Very Simple Change.

There are lots of reasons why many of us are not quite at the level of fitness that we desire. Maybe we want to lose a few pounds around the midsection or maybe we want to tighten and tone our arms and legs. Whatever the goal is we need to keep in mind that weight management is 70% nutrition. Now, I am not discrediting exercise in the least. But as our name “Out Run Your Fork” suggests: if you exercise a lot and continue to miss step on your nutrition, then you’ll never get where you want to go. Exercise alone is not enough. You simply can’t Out Run Your Fork.

So let’s start by focusing what is in your control. If we think about it they’re only four things we can control: 

  • our thoughts
  • our words
  • our attitudes
  • our actions

While there are many root causes as to why people don’t do what they’re supposed to do, we are going to leave the first three items for future articles. This article was going to focus on the final one of these: our actions.

I heard somebody say once, “It all starts with your hand.” He went on to explain that when you’re making a choice you could choose to reach for a healthy food or you can choose to reach for an unhealthy food. It’s what you reach for that’s going to determine what you put in your body. If you don’t put it in your hand, then you can’t eat it. Think about it for a minute. It’s so simple, so why is it so difficult? The answer is determined by one word: desire.

Desire: that which we fix in the foremost of our minds is what we focus on minute after minute, day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year. It creates a burning desire to reach that goal. But a burning desire without a plan of action will not yield results. Without a plan of action there will be no action. So, the first step is to create a goal and that an action plan on how to reach that goal. The next step is to simply move into action. The simplest action is to make better choices. The way you can make better choices is by reaching for foods that will move you closer to your goal and leaving the food alone that will prevent you from moving toward your goal. Is everyone with me so far? Good!

Let’s turn that desire into action: 

  • The next time you are given the choice of reaching for an apple or a muffin, choose the apple! 
  • When you know you’ve eaten your portion of food, don’t reach out for more!
  • If given the choice of baked potato or french fries, duh!… (yes, go for the potato)!

Set friendly reminders. Write a note on your hand that says “It starts here.” Put a note on your debit card or wallet. On Your refrigerator door. On your water bottle. Anywhere you can see it prior to grabbing that piece of coffee cake and ramming it into your face. Keep healthy snacks nearby: an apple in the car or desk drawer at work. A small amount of nuts (look at the serving size!) in your purse. A protein shake  in your gym bag. A low calorie protein bar in your briefcase. Sneak in healthier alternatives wherever and whenever you can. TIP: Just be sure to watch total calories!

STOP reaching for the Bad and START reaching for the Good!

For more helpful information on healthy eating and fitness why not take advantage of a Free No Obligation Phone or In-Person Consultation. Call usemail us or book your free appointment today!

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Are You Working Out TOO Hard?

Know Your Genetics

Know Your Genetics

What’s a MET?
Eating well and exercise go hand-in-hand when it comes to committing to living a healthier lifestyle. How do know if you’re exercising enough to get the maximum benefit out of your workout? The key lies in tracking your METS. But what the heck is a MET?

A “Metabolic Equivalent of Task” is a way of measuring the amount of exertion expended during different physical activities. Values are assigned to each physical activity as a ratio of the rate of energy consumed during an activity compared to the energy used while your body is at rest. METs are essentially a point system for exercise. The more energy required performing the activity, the higher its MET value will be. For example, sitting and watching television for one hour has a MET value of 1 while running at a pace of six miles per hour has a MET value of 9.8.

Now that you know what a MET is, how do you know how many you need to maximize your fat burning results? The Inherent Health Weight Management Test not only determines whether an individual is likely to respond better to a low-carb, low-fat, or balanced diet based on their genotype, it also places an individual into two groups of exercise needs based on the intensity levels necessary to trigger the fat burning process. We call these two groups Moderate MET and High MET.

Individuals in the Moderate MET group have the luxury of benefiting from virtually any exercise and can still reap results by doing moderate intensity activities in the range of 3 to 5.9 METs for a weekly total of at least 7.5 METs. For example, consider the following exercise log for a Moderate MET individual:

Day 1: Sweeping the garage, sidewalk and outside of house for 30 minutes
MET value of 4 x 0.5 hours = 2 METs

Day 2: Running for 30 minutes at a pace of 4 miles per hour
MET value of 6 x 0.5 hours = 3 METs

Day 3: Taking a water aerobics class for an hour.
MET value of 5.5 x 1 hour = 5.5 METs

Day 4: Walking at less than 2.0 miles per hour for 20 minutes
MET value of 2 x .33 hours = .66 METs. (This activity does not count toward the total because the activity’s MET value of 2 is under the 3 MET minimum)

WEEKLY TOTAL: 10.5 METs and successfully over the minimum of 7.5 METs for the week

Meanwhile, those in the High MET group need to engage in activities that are 6 METs or greater per activity, for a total of 13 METs per week, in order to trigger the fat burning process. For instance:

Day 1: Running for 30 minutes at 5.2 miles per hour
MET value of 9 x 0.5 hours = 4.5 METs 

Day 2: Running for one hour at 5.2 miles per hour
MET value of 9 x 1 hour = 9 METs

Day 3: Taking a one hour long pleasure walk
MET Value of 3.5 x 1 hour = 3.5 METs (This activity does not count toward the total because the activity’s MET value of 3.5 is under the 6 MET minimum)

Day 4: Riding a stationary bicycle at 15-20 miles per hour for 30 minutes
MET value of 8.8 x 0.5 hours = 4.4 METs

WEEKLY TOTAL: 17.9 METs and successfully over the minimum of 13 METs for the week

Remember, these are the minimum levels of effort required to trigger the fat burning process—more is always better. If you can’t perform exercises in the MET ranges suggested, start slow and build up to the appropriate MET value for your genotype. If you have a question about the MET value of a particular activity or are interested in learning more, then feel free to drop us an email and we will answer your questions.

 

Yours in Health,

Tony Bianchino
Out Run Your Fork
973-348-9898